Single brisket stuffed sweet potato topped with cheese and BBQ sauce

Brisket Stuffed Baked Sweet Potatoes

You just can’t have a cookout without deliciously moist brisket! And these hearty Brisket Stuffed Baked Sweet Potatoes will take center stage. Tender brisket smoked low and slow for over 8 hours is generously stuffed into baked sweet potatoes and topped with tangy barbecue sauce, shredded cheddar cheese, chives, and an optional dollop of sour cream. They are a must for your next BBQ.

overhead shot of three brisket stuffed baked potatoes
juneteenth cookout collaboration

Join me in celebrating Juneteenth by checking out the list of contributors to the 2021 Juneteenth Virtual Cookout down below. 40+ black creators contributed to this collaborative menu as a Freedom Day tribute. Juneteenth marks our country’s second independence day, the final emancipation of those enslaved in the US back in announced in 1865. Join in, share, and help us continue the legacy of celebrating progress. Additionally, you can easily follow each participant by using the hashtag #JuneteenthCookout2021 on Instagram.


I have a long history with sweet potatoes. I remember my grandfather would always come back from his garden with them — on a daily basis. And no matter what was served as the main course, he would always make his dinner plate with a baked sweet potato on the side. After taking my first bite off of that buttery sweet potato off his plate (we got away with that when we were younger), I was sold from then on.

And while sweet potatoes are great as a solo act, they are even better when they’re stuffed with tender barbeque brisket. It takes this recipe to a new heights. The slight sweetness from the roasted sweet potatoes and the smokiness from the brisket is a match made.

Plus, sweet potatoes are loaded with nutritional benefits so it makes eating them a win-win.

Ingredients you’ll need to make your stuffed sweet potatoes:

  • Let’s start with the brisket. I used a 10 lb. grass-fed beef brisket “point cut” from my local butcher for this recipe. Below you’ll find more details on what to look for when buying a brisket and a few tips and tricks on preparing it for its low and slow cooking process.
  • To season my brisket, I keep things simple. This is one of those recipes where too much may ruin it. A combination of Brown Sugar Bourbon Seasoning, basil flakes, garlic powder, black pepper, and Himalayan pink salt. Let the meat shine!
  • Aside from the brisket, the sweet potatoes are the star of the show. Start with a many as you need, but normally 6-8 sweet potatoes are plenty for a small cookout.
  • When your sweet potatoes and brisket are all ready to go, you can add on those optional toppings. A few of my favorites are butter, shredded sharp cheddar cheese, sour cream, chives, and Sweet Baby Ray’s BBQ sauce.
sliced slab of smoked brisket with a dark bark
This is the “point cut”

Tips when buying, preparing, and smoking your brisket:

The Size: A whole brisket is typically more than 12 pounds, but your butcher can cut it per your request. I went with 10 pounds because for a cookout you are feeding several hungry folks. I wouldn’t go too much smaller than this if you’re planning to do the same. For reference, a 14-pound brisket can feed 25-30 people. So buy what you need. A general rule of thumb: buy a 1/2 pound for every person you are serving.

The Cut: There are two cuts when it comes to brisket. The “point cut” carries most of the marbling and fat, and the “flat cut” is more uniform and topped with a thick cap of fat (this keeps the meat moist while smoking). The flat is the cut you normally find at your grocer, and it makes up a majority of the brisket. If you go for the flat cut, grab the one that’s most uniform in size, and that includes the fat cap. This will ensure even cooking throughout.

A quick tip: The flat is great for slicing and the point is perfect for those tasty burnt ends and shredding for sandwiches.

I love the “point cut”! I actually grew up calling this “loose cut.” It is so rich because it has more fat and texture than the flat. But since many people grew up eating the flat cut, when in doubt, go that route.

Shanna Jones

The Trim: The fat cap is a much-required part of the brisket, but too much if it is just that — too much. A cap that is too thick will not render properly while smoking. So when buying your brisket, go for the fat cap that is 1/4 to 1/2-inch thick (if you’re buying the flat cut).

The Smoke: I use a Pit Boss Pellet Grill, and I smoke my 10-pound brisket for a total of 8-10 hours at 250-275 degrees Fahrenheit. I preheat it with the lid closed to reach my starting temperature. The brisket is placed fat side down directly on the grill grate and is smoked for 4 hours. I then wrap the brisket in foil and finishing smoking for another 4-6 hours. After 8 to 10 hours of smoking, I can promise you the wait will not leave you disappointed. You have that nice create char on the outside, but the insides will be juicy and tender like no other.

Single brisket stuffed sweet potato topped with cheese and BBQ sauce

Smoking Brisket & Baked Potato FAQs:

Should I smoke my brisket fat side down or fat side up?

The fat acts as a heat shield for your brisket, so it depends on what type of smoker you have. Point your fat in the direction of the heat. If the heat comes from below, place your brisket fat side down.

How long does it take to smoke brisket?

This is the question of the day and is also to most difficult as that answer as it’s based 100% on the cut and the size. To achieve the best results, smoke your beef brisket low and slow at 250-275 degrees Fahrenheit for ~60 minutes per pound. If your heat is too low, it will not render the fat, and we don’t want that inedible layer that results if not rendered properly. The total smoking time can range between 8 to 12 hours depending on the cut, and some pitmasters take it even longer.

Should I wrap my brisket while smoking?

Yes and no. You’ll want to start smoking your meat without foil. This will give it time to create that nice dark bark on the exterior. At around the halfway mark, you’ll cover your brisket in foil. Wrapping it will help keep it moist and tender and keeps it from drying out.

Do I really need to poke holes in my sweet potatoes before placing them in the oven?

Well, I’ve never had a potato explode, but it could happen. Moisture builds up on the inside while baking, so to play it safe, poke a few holes in them. It doesn’t disrupt the baking process at all.

sprinkling chives on top of stuffed baked potato

Smoked brisket is the holy grail of barbecued meats. When done right, it will be the most tender, juicy, and flavorful piece of meat you have ever enjoyed. These Brisket Stuffed Baked Sweet Potatoes are what your next cookout needs! Buttery sweet potatoes stuffed with juicy and tender brisket topped off with shredded cheddar cheese and sour cream? Who wants to sign up?

Have some leftover brisket? Then you should definitely try my BBQ Brisket Twice Baked Potato, Fully Loaded Brisket Tater Tots, BBQ Brisket Pizza, Brisket Grilled Cheese Sandwich, or my Brisket Mac & Cheese.

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Single brisket stuffed sweet potato topped with cheese and BBQ sauce

Brisket Stuffed Baked Sweet Potatoes


  • Author: Eric Jones
  • Prep Time: 5 minutes
  • Cook Time: 10 hours
  • Total Time: 10 hours 5 minutes
  • Yield: 8 1x
  • Diet: Gluten Free

Description

Tender brisket smoked low & slow then generously stuffed into baked sweet potatoes and topped with tangy BBQ sauce, cheddar cheese, chives.


Ingredients

Scale
  • 10 lb. Grass-Fed Beef Brisket
  • 68 Sweet Potatoes
  • Sweet Baby Ray’s BBQ Sauce
  • Butter, optional
  • Shredded  Sharp Cheddar Cheese, optional
  • Sour Cream, optional
  • Chives, optional

Beef Brisket Seasonings:


Instructions

For the brisket:

  1. Preheat grill or smoker with cherry wood lid closed until temperatures reach between 250 to 275 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. While your grill is heating up, season both sides of beef brisket evenly. Place the brisket on the side of the grill away from the flame and close to the exhaust fat side down. Close lid.
  3. Smoke for 4 hours then remove it from the heat. Completely cover with foil and place the brisket back on the grill for another 4 to 6 hours or until cooked to the desired temperature. Be sure to maintain the same temperature on the grill.
  4. Once done, allow the brisket to rest for 15 minutes.
  5. Slice brisket then chop the desired amount of brisket to serve with your sweet potatoes. Set to the side.

For the sweet potatoes:

  1. With a fork, poke holes on both sides of the sweet potato. Bake at 425 degrees for 45-50 minutes.
  2. Allow sweet potato to cool.
  3. Slice open and slightly smash the sweet potato insides with a fork.
  4. Stuff with chopped brisket and optional butter, cheese, sour cream, chives, and BBQ sauce.
  5.  Serve immediately.

Notes

There are two cuts when it comes to brisket. The “point cut” carries most of the marbling and fat and the “flat cut” is more uniform and topped with a thick cap of fat (this keeps the meat moist while smoking). The flat is the cut you normally what you’ll find at your grocer and it makes up a majority of the brisket. If you go for the flat cut, grab the one that’s most uniform in size and that includes the fat cap. This will ensure even cooking throughout.

To achieve the best results, smoke your beef brisket at 250-275 degrees Fahrenheit for ~60 minutes per pound. If your heat is too low it will not render the fat and we want that inedible layer that will result if not rendered properly.

Point your fat in the direction of the heat. If the heat comes from below, place your brisket fat side down.

You’ll want to start smoking your meat without foil. This will give it time to create that nice dark bark on the brisket. At around the halfway mark, you cover your brisket in foil. Wrapping it will help keep it moist and tender and keeps it from drying out.

  • Category: BBQ
  • Method: Grill
  • Cuisine: American

Nutrition

  • Calories: 890
  • Sugar: 5.2g
  • Sodium: 213mg
  • Fat: 71.6g
  • Carbohydrates: 3.9g
  • Fiber: 0.6g
  • Protein: 53.7g
  • Cholesterol: 213mg

Keywords: Brisket Stuffed Baked Sweet Potatoes, Baked Sweet Potatoes, Stuffed Baked Sweet Potatoes, Brisket Stuffed Baked Potatoes, Stuffed Baked Potatoes

I collaborated with my fellow black food bloggers for this Juneteenth cookout takeover and they are highlighting some of their favorite recipes as well. Here are a few of my favorites. Note: These recipes do not contain pork or shellfish:

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